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Call for Papers for Edited Volume Austerity discources: An interdisciplinary critical analysis
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Submissions are invited for an interdisciplinary, edited collection involving contributions from economists and linguists, the over-arching aim of which is critically to investigate contemporary discourses of austerity.

9/25/2015 to 11/30/2015
When: 9/25/2015
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Call for papers for Edited Volume
Austerity discourses: An interdisciplinary critical analysis

Submissions are invited for an interdisciplinary, edited collection involving contributions from economists and linguists, the over-arching aim of which is critically to investigate contemporary discourses of austerity.

In the immediate aftermath of the financial crisis of 2008 governments around the developed world coordinated policy moves to stimulate economic activity and avert a depression. However, in subsequent years the perceived need to control government debt became the dominant narrative in public debate on economic policy. Cuts to public expenditure, or austerity, were seen as necessary to avert disaster, on both sides of the Atlantic, and few players in mainstream public discourse have offered a coherent alternative policy prescription.

In this context, we are particularly interested in exploring attitudes towards and arguments about austerity, as played out in media, academic and policy settings.

This volume offers a unique opportunity for collaboration between economists and linguists, as well as a venue in which economic and linguistic approaches can be compared. We therefore invite contributions from individual economists and linguists, but also strongly encourage coauthored papers that demonstrate the value of working across disciplines.

Papers dealing with any aspect of the relationships between austerity and discourse are welcome.
Some possible topics include:
• Stance-taking and argumentation in public debates around austerity
• Uses of metaphor in the cases for and against austerity
• Media stereotyping (e.g., according to class, gender and ethnicity)
• Comparing public and academic discourses
• Treatment of non-mainstream views within academia
• Case studies of austerity discourse in different countries

The language of the publication is English.

Please send an abstract of maximum 500 words, as an email attachment, to Kate Power (katpower@mail.ubc.ca) and Tanweer Ali (tanweer.ali@esc.edu) by November 30, 2015.

Please include clear details of: the title and main thematic focus of the article; the research design and methodologies used; and key findings or contributions that the paper will make to understandings of austerity discourse. Every abstract submitted will be assessed and authors will be contacted through their email addresses by January 15, 2016.

Final submissions of between 6,500-8,500 words will be due by May 30, 2016. Each paper should contain a cover page (included in the email attachment containing the document) with the following information: title of paper, name(s) of the author(s), affiliation, contact address (postal and email), and telephone number.

Inquiries may be directed to the editors:

Kate Power, PhD
katpower@mail.ubc.ca
Arts Studies in Research and Writing
University of British Columbia

Tanweer Ali, MA, CFA, FRM
tanweer.ali@esc.edu
Empire State College
State University of New York

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